Argentina

Argentina

Use Normal Level of Caution

Argentina is the second largest country in South America, with a long coastline on the Atlantic Ocean and bordering Chile and Uruguay. The terrain varies from the plateau of Patagonia in the south, the mountainous Andes along the western border and the plains of the Pampas in the north. The population of the country is about 42,000,000.

Argentina is a democratic republic with a federation of 23 provinces. The chief of state and head of government is a president with an appointed cabinet.

Argentina is now one of the highest ranking countries in South America for quality of life. The country is known for its natural beauty, natural resources, rich literary history, film industry, and music and dance. This country is the birthplace of the tango, and in 2009, UNESCO named the tango as a world cultural heritage.

Argentina enjoys a diverse cuisine, including many European dishes and also indigenous dishes, such as empanadas and chorizo, Argentine steak and Argentine barbecue. The country is one of the largest producers of wine in the world.

Currency ARS: Argentine peso
Language Spanish. Languages also spoken are English, Italian, German, and French.
Capital Buenos Aires
Recent Alerts 1
Latest Alert June 05, 2017 - Aviation strike in Argentina June 6, 2017

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Argentina. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Argentina.

Hepatitis B

There is a low risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in this country, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Dengue Fever

Dengue fever outbreaks have occurred in the north and northeast areas of Argentina.

Chagas Disease

Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis) occurs in northern Argentina. However, the risk of travellers acquiring this disease is low unless staying in very poor quality housing or camping.

Malaria

Areas of Argentina at risk include rural areas of northern Salta Province (along the Bolivian border), Chaco, Corrientes and Misiones Provinces (along the Paraguay border). No risk at Iguazu Falls.

Yellow Fever

There is a limited risk of yellow fever transmission. The yellow fever vaccination is recommended for travellers ≥9 months of age going to Corrientes and Misiones Provinces. It is generally not recommended for travellers going to Formosa Province and designated areas of Chaco, Jujuy, and Salta Provinces. Not recommended for all travellers whose itineraries are limited to areas and provinces not listed above.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in Argentina. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Zika Fever

Zika fever occurs in this country.

Chikungunya Fever

Chikungunya fever occurs in this country.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Argentina.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

The yellow fever vaccination is recommended for travellers ≥9 months of age going to Corrientes and Misiones Provinces. It is generally not recommended for travellers going to Formosa Province and designated areas of Chaco, Jujuy, and Salta Provinces. Not recommended for all travellers whose itineraries are limited to areas and provinces not listed above.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a low risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, and the vaccination is recommended.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Argentina.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Although the risk of malaria is low, travellers may consider anti-malaria medication if travelling in rural areas of northern Salta Province (along the Bolivian border), Chaco and Misiones Provinces (along the Paraguay border). Recommended anti-malaria medication includes atovaquone-proguanil, chloroquine, doxycycline and mefloquine.

Safety and Security in Argentina

Emergency Numbers

911 In Buenos Aires and surrounding province of Buenos Aires
101 24-hour police help line
100
107
112 Mobile phones - Directs to local emergency number
0800-999-5000 Tourist Police - can be reached from anywhere in the country - multi-lingual
0261-413-2135 Mendoza Tourist Police
0261-15-6444-324 After-hours mobile phone number for Medoza Tourist Police

Personal Safety

Travellers to Argentina should exercise a high degree of caution. Valuables should be kept out of sight and backpacks and bags watched at all times. Travellers are advised to avoid showing signs of affluence, such as expensive clothing. Ensure that travel documents and passports are kept secure at all times.

Theft and petty crime occur commonly in public areas ,such as transportation hubs, restaurants, and internet cafés, particularly in major cities like Buenos Aires and Mendoza. Armed robbery can also occur. Travellers are advised to immediately give the criminal their cash and other valuables to prevent injury.

Tourists should be particularly cautious in major cities and should avoid walking alone after dark in downtown areas of these cities. In Buenos Aires, be alert in your surroundings, particularly in the areas of San Telmo, La Boca, Retiro, Florida Street and Rivadavia Avenue near the obelisk area. Travellers should stay on the main tourist streets in the La Boca area of Buenos Aires and completely avoid the area after dark. Mendoza has seen a considerable increase in crime, sometimes involving violence. Be particularly cautious at the bus terminal and the General San Martin Park. Travellers are advised to remain alert and cautious at all times and avoid walking in unpopulated areas after dark.

Book taxis in advance if possible. If you need to hail a taxi on the street, use only “radio taxis,”
with the taxi's company name and telephone number visible.

Kidnappings can occur in larger cities. Victims are randomly picked from the street and a ransom is demanded or they are forced to withdraw money from automated banking machines. The victim is usually quickly released when the ransom is paid, while injuries can occur if the victim resists.

Areas To Avoid

Travellers should exercise caution near Iguazú Falls and areas near the borders between Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay. Criminal activities are known to occur here. These borders should not be crossed after dark in local taxis or buses.

Political Unrest

Demonstrations, strikes, and roadblocks can occur at any time, resulting in transportation difficulties and fuel shortages. Travellers should avoid demonstrations as they can turn violent unexpectedly. Never attempt to cross a road blockade, even if it appears unattended.

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