Bosnia & Herzegovina

Bosnia & Herzegovina

Use Normal Level of Caution

Bosnia and Herzegovina is located in southeastern Europe on the Balkan Peninsula. Bordering countries include Serbia and Montenegro on the east and Croatia and the Adriatic Sea on the north, west, and southwest. The population is about 4,500,000 people.

The government is a parliamentary democracy that is transforming its economy into a market-oriented system. The executive branch of the government is a rotating presidency among representatives of the three major groups: Bosniak, Croat, and Serb. Each of the three representatives is elected by the people to a four year term. The Office of the High Representative was established by the Dayton Accords of 1995, and this office is the state's ultimate authority.

Bosnia and Herzegovina became an independent state after the Yugoslav Wars in the 1990s. The economy has suffered in the face of rebuilding after the war.

The country is increasingly becoming a tourist destination. The influence of the Turks and the Austro-Hungarian Empire has contributed to a rich history and culture.

Currency BAM: Convertible mark
Language Bosnian and Croatian. Serbian is also spoken.
Capital Sarajevo
Recent Alerts 1
Latest Alert June 06, 2017 - Protests in Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina on June 8, 2017

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Bosnia & Herzegovina. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis occurs in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Travellers to this country are at risk for tuberculosis if visiting sick friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Tick-Borne Encephalitis

There is a risk of tick-borne encephalitis in some areas of the country below 750 meters.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Bosnia & Herzegovina.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccine

Vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis is recommended if travelling in areas where contact with ticks might occur (camping, hiking, outdoor activities) below 750 meters during early spring to late autumn (March to November).

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Bosnia & Herzegovina.

None required.

Safety and Security in Bosnia & Herzegovina

Emergency Numbers

122
124
123
112 From mobile phones

Personal Safety

Unmarked landmines continue to pose a threat in Bosnia and Herzegovina as the majority of mined areas are not marked. Travellers should always stay on main roads and paved surfaces and should avoid abandoned houses and buildings. Mountainous areas, rural areas, and areas outside of Sarajevo may be particularly dangerous as these areas are former conflict zones.

Petty crime is fairly common in Bosnia and Herzegovina, particularly in tourist and urban areas. Avoid showing signs of affluence, such as expensive clothing and jewellery, to reduce the risk of becoming a target for theft. Travellers should ensure their personal belongings, valuables, and travel documents are kept secure at all times. Avoid isolated and poorly lit areas after dark.

Organized crime has increased the rate of random violence and use of firearms in Sarajevo. Travellers are rarely targeted for violent crime, however, nightclubs and cafés should be avoided late at night and in the early morning as organized crime violence can occur in these areas.

Travellers must register with local police within 24 hours of arriving in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Hotels will register guest names with local police.

Political Unrest

Demonstrations can occur in Bosnia and Herzegovina as a result of conflict between ethnic and religious groups. Travellers should avoid large gatherings and political demonstrations as they may become violent without warning.

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