Croatia

Croatia

Use Normal Level of Caution

The Republic of Croatia is located in central and southeastern Europe, bordering on the Adriatic Sea. The population is approximately 4.4 million people. Neighbouring countries include Slovenia, Hungary, Bosnia and Herzogovenia, Serbia and Montenegro. The government is a parliamentary republic with a president as chief of state and a prime minister as head of government.

Croatia declared its independence from the former Yugoslavia in 1991. The Croatian War of Independence subsequently broke out, and in the following four years, there was bitter fighting with Serbia in the former Yugoslavia. The war ended in Croatian victory, and in 1998, under the supervision of the United Nations, the last Serbian-held area was returned to Croatia.

In 2011, Croatia signed a European Union accession treaty which will lead the way toward full membership on 1 July 2013. In January 2012, Croatian voters voted two to one in a referendum to back joining the European Union.

The return of tourism is one sector that has helped Croatia's economy. Visitors can enjoy the coastline of the Adriatic Sea, Dubrovnic, monuments, museums, churches and other historic sites. There are seven UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Croatia.

Currency HRK: Kuna
Language Croatian
Capital Zagreb
Recent Alerts 4
Latest Alert August 06, 2017 - Union for Croatia Airline calls off strike for August 8, 2017

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Croatia. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Croatia through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Croatia.

Tick-Borne Encephalitis

Tick-borne encephalitis occurs during the warmer months in Croatia, most often in early and late summer when ticks are most active.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in this country. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Croatia.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccine

Travellers who plan to visit this country during the summer months and hike or camp in rural or forested areas that provide a habitat for the ticks that carry the virus should consider obtaining this vaccine. This vaccine is only available in Europe.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Croatia.

None required.

Safety and Security in Croatia

Emergency Numbers

112

Personal Safety

Violent crime in Croatia is rare. Petty crime, such as pickpocketing, can occur in tourist areas, particularly along the Adriatic Coast. Organized crime has increased, but travellers and foreigners are not targeted. Keep valuables out of sight, and avoid showing signs of affluence to avoid being targeted for theft. Keep backpacks and bags in sight at all times.

Remaining landmines are a serious risk in Croatia, especially in eastern Slavonia (Vukovar, Osijek), the counties of Sisak-Moslavna, Zadar, Lika-Senj, Brodsko-Posavska, Karlovac, the areas around the Plitvice Lake region, the border area with Serbia and Montenegro and south of Dubrovnik, near Konavle. Although some signs indicate that landmines may have been removed, visitors are strongly advised to stay on paved roads and avoid open fields, ditches, or off-road areas not clearly marked as landmine-free. For more information, travellers may find the Croatian Mine Action Center (CROMAC) at http://www.hcr.hr/en/index.asp.

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