Indonesia

Indonesia

Use Normal Level of Caution
Use High Level of Caution when visiting the following provinces: Aceh and Maluku
Avoid Travel to the following provinces: Papua and Sulawesi Tengah

The Republic of Indonesia, located in Southeast Asia, is an archipelago of 17,508 islands, between the Indian Ocean and the Pacific Ocean. The population is around 245 million people.

The government is a republic with a president as both chief of state and head of government, and the president is elected by popular vote.

Indonesia is a country with the world's largest Muslim population. The country is noted for its distinct ethnic, linguistic, and religious groups. The Javanese are the largest, most politically dominant ethnic group. Indonesia has a high level of biodiversity supported by vast unexplored areas of wilderness. Although the country is rich in natural resources, poverty is widespread.

Indonesia encourages tourism and visitors can see rice fields, volcanoes, many beaches, jungles in Sumatra, Kalimantan and Papua with large numbers of monkeys, sun bears, leopards, orangutans and marsupials and untouched islands.

Currency IDR: Rupiah
Language Indonesian
Capital Jakarta
Recent Alerts 8
Latest Alert November 14, 2019 - Tsunami Alert for Indonesia

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Indonesia. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Malaria

Malaria risk exists throughout the year in most areas of the five eastern provinces of East Nusa Tenggara, Maluku, North Maluku, Papua, and West Papua. In other parts of the country, there is malaria risk in some districts, except in Jakarta and Ubud Municipalities, resort areas of Bali and Java, and Gili Islands and the Thousand Islands (Pulau Seribu). There are low levels of transmission in rural areas of Java, including Pangandaran, Sukalumi, and Ujung Kulong. A rare form of malaria that circulates in monkeys (P. knowlesi) has been reported in the province of Kalimantan.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Indonesia through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Indonesia.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Indonesia, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Japanese encephalitis

Japanese encephalitis is presumed to occur year-round in rural Indonesia and has been reported in the following areas: Kalimantan, Bali, Nusa Tenggara, Sulawesi, Mollucas, Papua (Irian Jaya), and Lombok. The risk for travellers of contracting Japanese encephalitis is low, but visiting the listed areas and extensive outdoor activity in rural areas will increase this risk.

Dengue Fever

Dengue fever outbreaks occur in Indonesia, particularly in East Java. The risk is higher in heavily populated urban areas and during the rainy season.

Chikungunya Fever

Chikungunya occurs in Indonesia.

Elephantiasis

Filariasis occurs in Indonesia.

Schistosomiasis

Schistosomiasis is found in Indonesia. It is acquired through contact with fresh water, such as when swimming, bathing, or rafting. Well-chlorinated swimming pools and saltwater in oceans or seas will not put travellers at risk for schistosomiasis.

Scrub Typhus

Scrub typhus, also known as Tsutsugamushi fever, generally occurs year-round in some areas of Indonesia.

Tuberculosis

Travellers to Indonesia are at risk for tuberculosis if visiting sick friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Yellow Fever

There is no risk of yellow fever transmission in this country. This country requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for travellers over 9 months of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in this country. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Cholera

Cholera has occurred in this country.

Zika Fever

There is transmission of the Zika virus in this country.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Indonesia.

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine

Vaccination is recommended only for those planning to visit rural areas in Kalimantan, Bali, Nusa Tenggara, Sulawesi, Mollucas, Papua (Irian Jaya), and Lombok. The vaccination is not required for travellers visiting urban areas only.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country. Therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country. Therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through the consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

There is no risk of yellow fever transmission in this country. This country requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for travellers over 9 months of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Cholera Vaccine

The U.K. NaTHNaC recommends the oral cholera vaccine for some travellers whose activities or medical history put them at increased risk, travelling to areas of active cholera transmission. These risk factors include: aid workers; those going to areas of cholera outbreaks who have limited access to potable water and medical care; travellers for whom the vaccination would be considered potentially beneficial, such as chronic medical conditions. The U.S. CDC recommends the cholera vaccine for travellers who are 18-64 years of age and who plan to travel to areas of active cholera transmission. CDC notes that most travellers do not travel to areas of active cholera transmission, and that safe food and water practices can prevent many cholera infections.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Indonesia.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Recommended anti-malaria medication includes atovaquone-proguanil, doxycycline, or mefloquine. Anti-malaria drug resistance for chloroquine is present.

Safety and Security in Indonesia

Emergency Numbers

112
110 or SMS 1717
113
118
119 Medical Emergencies
(0361) 759 687 Tourist police (Bali)
(201) 526 4073 Tourist police (Jakarta)

Emergency response and services may be limited. Travellers may need to go directly to a police station or hospital for service. Carry local emergency contact information.

Personal Safety

There is a high level of crime in Indonesia. Petty crime, such as pickpocketing, bag snatching, or other theft occur frequently. Keep valuables out of sight to avoid becoming a target for theft. Safeguard your important documents, such as your passport. Avoid walking alone at night. Do not accept drinks or food from strangers and never leave your drinks out of your sight.

Travellers should exercise caution when choosing accommodations, places of worship, shopping areas, restaurants, clubs and other tourist facilities, and be aware of the facilities’ security level.

Indonesia has strict drug laws and severe penalties for drug offences.

Women travellers, in particular, should be aware that the Aceh Province, located at the northern end of Sumatra, implements Islamic law (Sharia law). Female travellers should inform themselves as to the specifics of the law. For example, in Aceh, women are banned from entertainment venues, such as internet cafes, tourist sites, sports facilities after 23:00 unless accompanied by a husband or male family member. The province's morality police could detain a woman for being in an entertainment venue after 23:00. Also, unmarried men and women are banned from riding together on a motorbike in one of the districts of Aceh Province. Women are only allowed to ride motorbikes sidesaddle.

The incidence of road accidents is high in Indonesia. Road travel may be dangerous due to poor road conditions, traffic congestion and reckless driving. Exercise extreme caution in rural areas where roads may be unpaved and unlit at night. Avoid travelling after dark. Driving is on the left.

Public transportation and ferry safety standards are poor. Exercise caution.

Exercise extreme caution when participating in outdoor adventure activities as safety standards may not be adequate. Ensure travel and medical insurance is acquired before leaving and make sure your insurance policy covers outdoor adventure activities, including emergency medical evacuation. Also exercise caution when swimming as currents may be strong and unpredictable.

You must always carry your passport and your stay permit with you.

Travellers should take note of whether they will be travelling during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. During this time, respect the religious practices of the country and avoid eating, drinking and smoking in public between sunrise and sunset. Always dress and behave conservatively to respect local customs.

LGBTI travellers should note that same-sex behaviours are not socially tolerated, and in some provinces, same-sex behaviours are illegal and severely punishable.

Indonesia has 129 active volcanoes. Heed the advice of local authorities if travelling to an area with an active volcano, and, in the event of an eruption, follow the local evacuation orders.

Indonesia's location in an active seismic zone makes the country prone to earthquakes and tsunamis.

Air pollution also presents health and safety risk to the traveller, especially between June-October.

The rainy season in Indonesia is between November-March, although heavy rains can occur at any time of the year. This can result in landslides and flooding with little warning, especially in remote areas where extensive deforestation is common. These incidents have led to numerous fatalities and extensive destruction of property. Travellers should monitor regional weather forecasts and follow warnings issued by local authorities.

Areas To Avoid

Avoid travel to the province of Papua due to the risk of violence in response to political tensions. At the time of writing, a permit must be obtained before travelling to Papua province, although this could change at any time. Consult the local authorities.

Extreme caution should be maintained at all times in the province of Aceh. Sharia law is enforced in parts of Aceh by religious police. Travellers should ensure their behaviour does not offend local sensitivities.

Sporadic ethnic and religious tensions in areas of Indonesia have resulted in violence and civil unrest. Travellers should avoid the areas of Maluku and Sulawesi Tengah (Central Sulawesi), due to religious tensions between Christian and Muslim groups resulting in violent incidents and conflict.

Extreme Violence

There is a risk of terrorism in Indonesia. Indonesian authorities continue to put counterterrorism measures in place. Always be aware of your surroundings, monitor local media and follow the advice of local authorities in the event of terrorism.

Political Unrest

Large and occasionally violent protests have occurred in the past. Travellers should avoid all such demonstrations and gatherings, monitor local news, and follow the advice of local authorities.

There is long-standing tension and violence between ethnic groups, particularly in the Central Sulawesi, Maluku and West Papua provinces.

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