Nepal

Nepal

Use Normal Level of Caution

The Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal is located in Southern Asia in the Himalayas between India and China. The population is approximately 29 million people. Although, Nepali is the official language, English and Hindi are also spoken in business and government. There are also over 100 regional languages spoken in Nepal.

The government of Nepal became a republic in May 2008. A president is chief of state, and the head of government is a prime minister.

Nepal is one of the world's poorest countries, with about half the population living in poverty. Agriculture is the main sector of the economy. Tourism is growing after being hindered by political events and the recent global economic crisis. Travellers are attracted to the trekking and mountaineering, since eight of the world's 10 highest peaks, including Mt. Everest, are in Nepal. Religion plays an important part of life in Nepal with the majority of the people following Hinduism and second, Buddhism. Visitors can also see temples, shrines, pilgrimage sites, and festivals.

Currency NPR: Nepalese rupee
Language Nepali
Capital Kathmandu
Recent Alerts 2
Latest Alert March 28, 2017 - U.S. government personnel restricted from Ozone Restaurant and Bar in Pokhara, Nepal

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Nepal. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Dengue Fever

Dengue fever outbreaks have occurred in Nepal, and the risk to travellers is significant. Outbreaks have occurred in the following districts: Banke, Bardiya, Dang, Jhapa, Parsa, Rupandehi, Kapilbastu, Dhading, and Kathmandu.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Nepal through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Nepal.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Nepal, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Malaria

All areas at altitudes less than 2,000 meters are at risk for malaria, including rural areas in Terai districts bordering India. No malaria in Kathmandu.

Leishmaniasis

Leishmaniasis is very common in the eastern Terai region of Nepal which lies adjacent to Bihar state in India. It is usually more common in rural than urban areas, and the risk of acquiring leishmaniasis is increased in travellers who spend time outdoors in rural areas and at night when sand flies typically feed.

Japanese encephalitis

In Nepal, outbreaks of Japanese encephalitis may occur between the months of July and December in the southern lowlands and in the Kathmandu Valley with the highest rates reported in the western Terai districts of Bankey, Bardia, Dang, and Kailali. The risk for travellers of contracting Japanese encephalitis is low, but visiting the listed areas and extensive outdoor activity in rural areas will increase this risk.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis occurs Nepal. Travellers are at risk when visiting friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Yellow Fever

There is no risk of yellow fever transmission in this country. However, a yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for travellers 1 year of age and older arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited more than 12 hours through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in this country. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Cholera

Cholera may occur in Nepal.

Scrub Typhus

Outbreaks of scrub typhus have been reported in this country.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Nepal.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine

Whether or not a traveller should receive this vaccine depends considerably on the itinerary and activities of the traveller. In Nepal, between July and December, if the itinerary includes the southern lowlands, the Kathmandu Valley, and the western Terai districts of Bankey, Bardia, Dang, and Kailali, vaccination is recommended.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

The yellow fever vaccination is not recommended for this country. However, this country requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for travellers 1 year of age and older arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited more than 12 hours through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Nepal.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Recommended anti-malaria medications include atovaquone-proguanil, doxycycline, or mefloquine. Anti-malaria drug resistance for chloroquine is present.

Safety and Security in Nepal

Emergency Numbers

100
+977-1-424-7041 Tourist Police

While police officials may speak English, always speak slowly and clearly enunciate to avoid misunderstanding.

Personal Safety

Travellers should always be aware of their surroundings and aware of personal security in Nepal. Armed robberies sometimes occur, in particular at tourist hotels or against tourist climbing groups. Petty crime, such as pick-pocketing, is also common at tourist locations, hotel rooms, and on public transportation. Crime increases during the festival season, from September to November. Ensure your personal belongings are kept safe at all times. Avoid travelling after dark.

Travellers should avoid showing signs of affluence such as expensive clothing. Female travellers in particular should wear conservative clothing to avoid harassment and verbal abuse.

Trekking can be dangerous in Nepal. There have been reports of Maoists asking for “donations” on popular hiking trails and then threatening or injuring climbers when no donations are offered. Travellers should comply with these requests to avoid injury and report any incidents. Emergency services, such as airlifts and rescues, might not be immediately available and accidents resulting in deaths have occurred. It is recommended that trekkers hire an experienced guide from a reputable trekking company and never trek alone. Trekkers should also ensure they have travel insurance that covers medical emergency and rescue services.

Public transportation should be avoided if possible. Serious collisions occur frequently resulting in deaths and severe injuries, especially at night. Tourist buses are generally safer.

The Monsoon season in Nepal normally runs from June to September. Travel in rural areas at this time may be hazardous.

Extreme Violence

Attacks sometimes occur as a result of political and ethnic conflict, for example the Maoist insurgency. Travellers are not directly targeted, however, the attacks still pose a risk to foreigners as they are unpredictable and have caused deaths and injuries, particularly in the Terai region. Travellers should expect to encounter military and police checkpoints, particularly at night.

Political Unrest

The political situation remains unstable after a period of civil unrest. Demonstrations and disruptive general strikes known as bandhs may occur. Although they are usually peaceful, travellers should avoid these political gatherings as they can become violent and lead to rioting without warning.

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