Singapore

Singapore

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The Republic of Singapore is an island country of 63 islands in southeastern Asia between Indonesia and Malaysia. The population is about 5 million people.

Singapore's government is a parliamentary republic. A president is chief of state elected by popular vote. A prime minister is head of government.

In 1819 Singapore was founded as a British trading colony. The country declared independence from Britain in 1963 and has gone on to become one of the world's most prosperous countries with a port that is one of the world's busiest. The port, airport, and road systems are some of the best in the world. Singapore is an important hub for this Asian region.

Singapore has a highly developed, free market economy and a high standard of living. Most people work in the service sector. Tourism is very important to the economy, and to attract tourists, the government has legalized gambling and allowed casinos to be built. Visitors can enjoy world class shopping and cuisine, and beach resorts.

Currency SGD: Singapore dollar
Language Mandarin, English, Malay and Tamil
Capital Singapore
Recent Alerts None
Latest Alert Not Available

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Singapore. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Singapore through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Singapore.

Japanese encephalitis

In Singapore, outbreaks of Japanese encephalitis occur sporadically year-round. The risk for travellers of contracting Japanese encephalitis is low.

Dengue Fever

Dengue fever outbreaks have occurred in Singapore, and the risk to travellers is significant.

Chikungunya Fever

Chikungunya is a viral disease that occurs in Singapore. Outbreaks of this disease usually occur during the tropical rainy season, however, outbreaks can occur in the dry season as well.

Yellow Fever

There is no risk of yellow fever transmission. However, this country requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for travellers 1 year of age and older who, within the preceding six days, have been in a country with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited more than 12 hours through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission.

Rabies

Rabies may be present in bats.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in this country, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis occurs in this country. Travellers to this country are at risk for tuberculosis if visiting sick friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Zika Fever

Zika fever does occur in Singapore.

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

Outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease have occurred in Singapore.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Singapore.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to Hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with Hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

There is no risk of yellow fever transmission. However, this country requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for travellers 1 year of age and older who, within the preceding six days, have been in a country with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited more than 12 hours through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission.

Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine

Short-term travellers with itineraries limited to urban areas are at very low risk. Vaccination is recommended for travellers who visit or work in rural agricultural areas, such as marsh lands and rice fields.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers whose activities or employment may bring them into direct contact with bats (i.e. adventure travellers, veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers, etc.).

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Singapore.

None required.

Safety and Security in Singapore

Emergency Numbers

999
995
995

Personal Safety

Singapore is a very safe country with a relatively low crime rate. However, petty crime, such as pick-pocketing, does occur in busy tourist areas and transportation hubs.

You should be aware that Singapore has very conservative expectations and laws, some of which apply to behaviour and some which would be considered minor in other countries. Familiarize yourself with these laws to avoid severe penalties. Some examples of these laws follow.

It is illegal to consume alcohol in Singapore in public between 22:30 (10:30 pm) and 07:00 (7 am). Drinking and driving can bring severe penalties, including up to 10 years in prison. Drunk and disorderly behaviour is not tolerated and is treated seriously.

Penalties for even minor drug offenses are severe, and penalties for drug convictions can range from fines to the death sentence. A person can be prosecuted for a drug offense if drug use is detected by blood or urine test even if the drugs were consumed outside Singapore.

Some prescription and over the counter medications could be controlled substances under Singapore law. Depending on your prescription medications, you may be required to apply for approval at least 10 working days prior to your arrival.

A law referred to as “outrage of modesty” covers a wide range of offenses. Penalties can range from fines to very severe consequences, and the law extends even to behaviour on airlines registered in Singapore. “Outrage of modesty” can include men behaving inappropriately towards women, using inappropriate language, inappropriate touching, etc.

Public display of affection could be considered offensive. Other behaviours that can bring penalties are smoking in public places, chewing gum or even bringing gum into the country, spitting, littering, jaywalking, eating or drinking on the transit system, etc.

You can be fined or possibly be given a jail sentence if you bring into the country items such as e-cigarettes, e-pipes, e-cigars and refills.

Political Unrest

In Singapore public demonstrations must be authorized, and a permit is required for a public gathering of more than four people. Any foreigner who wants to participate in this sort of activity, including at Speakers’ Corner in Hong Lim Park, must have a permit.

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