Trinidad & Tobago

Trinidad & Tobago

Use Normal Level of Caution

The Republic of Trinidad and Tobago is a nation of two islands northeast of Venezuela, between the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea and with a population of about 1.2 million people. Although English is the official language, French, Spanish, and Hindi are also spoken.

The government is a parliamentary democracy with a president as chief of state and a prime minister as the head of government.

Due to its oil and natural gas production, Trinidad and Tobago is one of the most prosperous countries in the Caribbean and enjoys a higher standard of living than many other countries in Latin America. The government is now planning to expand the tourism sector in Tobago.

Trinidad and Tobago is well known for its annual carnival, soca music, calypso music, and steel-pan bands. Trinidad is more of an industrial island with less tourist infrastructure. Visitors to Tobago can enjoy the beaches, diving, coral reefs, and rainforests .

Currency TTD: Trinidad and Tobago dollar
Language English
Capital Port of Spain
Recent Alerts 1
Latest Alert March 21, 2017 - Zika virus in the Caribbean - update

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Trinidad & Tobago. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Dengue Fever

Dengue fever outbreaks have occurred in Trinidad and Tobago, and the risk to travellers is significant.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Trinidad and Tobago through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Trinidad and Tobago.

Yellow Fever

There is a risk of exposure to yellow fever on the island of Trinidad except for the urban areas of Port of Spain. There is no risk on the island of Tobago. This country requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for travellers over 6 months of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission, including travellers transiting through Trinidad and Tobago from a country/territory with a risk of yellow fever transmission. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers 9 months of age or older travelling to Trinidad, with the exception of the following: travellers whose itineraries are limited to the urban areas of Port of Spain; cruise ship passengers who do not disembark from the ship; airplane passengers in transit; and travellers whose itineraries are limited to the island of Tobago.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Trinidad and Tobago, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Ciguatera Fish Poisoning

This kind of marine seafood toxin poisoning occurs sporadically in Trinidad and Tobago.

Chikungunya Fever

Chikungunya fever has occurred in this country.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in this country. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Zika Fever

There is transmission of the Zika virus in this country.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Trinidad & Tobago.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to yellow fever on the island of Trinidad except for the urban areas of Port of Spain. There is no risk on the island of Tobago. This country requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for travellers over 6 months of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission, including travellers transiting through Trinidad and Tobago from a country/territory with a risk of yellow fever transmission. Vaccination is recommended for all travellers 9 months of age or older travelling to Trinidad, with the exception of the following: travellers whose itineraries are limited to the urban areas of Port of Spain; cruise ship passengers who do not disembark from the ship; airplane passengers in transit; and travellers whose itineraries are limited to the island of Tobago.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Trinidad & Tobago.

None required.

Safety and Security in Trinidad & Tobago

Emergency Numbers

999
990
990
694-2404 SCIEMS - private ambulance service

Personal Safety

For Tobago:

Most travellers have no safety and security trouble in Tobago, however, petty crime does occur and tourists have been robbed. Always be alert and aware of your surroundings. Avoid showing signs of wealth and keep valuables out of sight to avoid being targeted. Avoid carrying large amounts of cash. Keep your belongings in sight at all times.

Ensure that your accommodations have adequate security, particularly accommodations in isolated areas.

Never walk alone in deserted areas day or night, including the beaches at Englishman’s Bay, King Peter’s Bay and Bacolet Beach unless with an organized group.

For Trinidad:

There is a high level of serious crime in Trinidad, including against tourists and expatriates. Exercise a high degree of caution. Always be alert and aware of your surroundings. Avoid showing signs of wealth, keep valuables and important documents secured, and avoid carrying large amounts of cash. Never walk in isolated or deserted areas.

There have been reports of robberies at tourist sites (day or night), including at Las Cuevas Beach, Maracas Beach, Fort George, the Pitch Lake, nightclubs, restaurants and other businesses, and in the parking areas of malls and supermarkets.

Gang-related violent crime occurs in Trinidad, particularly in the neighbourhoods east of the centre of Port of Spain, Laventille, Morvant, and Barataria. Other areas to avoid are Sea Lots, Belmont, inside the Queen’s Park Savannah, and Lady Young Road.

When driving at night, avoid any rest stops or scenic stops after dark.

Avoid travel outside of populated areas at night. On the road to and from Piarco International Airport, particularly on the Beetham/Churchill Roosevelt Highway and the Lady Young Road, there have been fatal auto accidents due to bad driving. There have been reports of gangs following cars from the airport and attacking people when they reach their destination. Criminals sometimes place debris on the highway, including cars, to force drivers to stop. Travel with windows closed and doors locked.

Book your taxis through a hotel or with reputable private taxis whose registration plates begin with “H.” Avoid using route taxis, maxi taxis, or shared taxis. Violent crime has occurred when these shared taxis stop to pick up additional passengers.

Exercise caution during festivals and carnival season.

It is illegal for civilians to wear army-style or camouflage clothing in Trinidad and Tobago.

Political Unrest

Avoid any demonstration or large public gathering since the situation can quickly and unexpectedly escalate and become violent.

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