Turkey

Turkey

Use High Level of Caution

The Republic of Turkey links Europe and Asia with portions of the country in both southern Europe and in western Asia. The country is between Bulgaria to the northwest and Syria to the southeast. Turkey has borders with eight countries, and most of its coastline borders on the Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea. Turkey's population is approximately 78 million people. The largest city is Istanbul.

The government of Turkey is a republican parliamentary democracy with a president as chief of state and a prime minister as head of government. Turkey is a democratic, secular republic and maintains a strict separation of religion and state.

Turkey is a popular holiday destination with over 28 million tourists reported in 2010. Visitors are drawn to beach resorts along the “Turkish Riviera,” and the country is also a cruise ship destination. Turkey is known for its ancient civilizations, thus many historical and archeological sites and nine UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Currency TRY: Turkish lira
Language Turkish
Capital Ankara
Recent Alerts 2
Latest Alert June 17, 2017 - Security alert for Istanbul, Turkey

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Turkey. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Malaria

Limited malaria risk exists from May to October in the following provinces: Diyarbakir, Mardin, and Sanliurfa. There is no malaria risk in the main tourist areas in the west and southwest of the country.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Turkey through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Turkey.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Turkey, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Leishmaniasis

Leishmaniasis occurs in Turkey, commonly in the southeastern region and the Tigris-Euphrates basin, the Aegean coast, the Mediterranean coast and the Black Sea coast. It is usually more common in rural than urban areas, and the risk of acquiring leishmaniasis is increased in travellers who spend time outdoors in rural areas and at night when sand flies typically feed.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in this country. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Schistosomiasis

There is very low risk of schistosomiasis in this country.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Turkey.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Turkey.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Anti-malarial medication is not recommended.

Safety and Security in Turkey

Emergency Numbers

112
155
110
0212) 5274503 Tourist police for Istanbul only

Personal Safety

Most travellers to Turkey have no trouble. The crime level is low. Petty theft, such as pickpocketing, does occur. Ensure your valuables are out of sight and your important travel documents are secure.

There is a threat from terrorism, including religious extremist groups and groups involved in the Syrian conflict. Attacks could occur in places frequented by foreigners.

With respect to your personal safety, be cautious and always be aware and alert in your surroundings.

Areas To Avoid

Avoid all travel to the Turkish towns of Akḉakale and Ceylanpinar. Avoid all but essential travel to areas within 10 kilometers of Turkey’s border with Syria and border areas with Iraq and Iran. The southeastern region of Turkey is dangerous due to military operations, criminal activities and terrorism, especially in the provinces along the border with Iraq and Syria. Avoid all but necessary travel to the areas of Sirnak, Mardin, Şanlıurfa, Gaziantep, Kilis, Hatay, Siirt, Tunceli, Diyarbakir, and Hakkari provinces.

Political Unrest

Since early 2013, there have been frequent demonstrations, some violent, and people have been killed. Minimize safety risk by avoiding public and political gatherings and demonstrations since even peaceful protests can quickly and unexpectedly become violent.

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