Mozambique

Mozambique

Use Normal Level of Caution
Use High Level of Caution when visiting the following provinces: Sofala

The Republic of Mozambique is in southeastern Africa bordering South Africa, Tanzania, Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Swaziland and with coastline on the Mozambique Channel of the Indian Ocean. The population is about 24 million people. Although Portuguese is the official language, Swahili, Makhuwa, and Sena are commonly spoken regional languages. The government is a republic with a president as chief of state and a prime minister as head of government.

Mozambique was a Portuguese colony for almost 500 years. Independence was achieved in 1975, but the country suffered years of political and economic instability due to famine, civil war, and corruption. After 1975, the country began to emerge as one of the fastest growing economies, especially with the natural resources of oil and gas, coal and titanium.

Mozambique has excellent tourism opportunities, however, the tourism sector of the economy is small for many reasons. There are limited hotel accommodations. Air travel to and from Mozambique is limited and fares are expensive. Visa regulations present difficulties. There is a need for tour operators and for funding to promote tourism in Mozambique.

Currency MZN: Mozambican metical
Language Portuguese
Capital Maputo
Recent Alerts 1
Latest Alert March 14, 2017 - Severe cholera outbreak in Mozambique continues

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Mozambique. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Mozambique.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Mozambique.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Mozambique, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Malaria

Malaria risk exists throughout the year in all of Mozambique.

Yellow Fever

There is no risk of yellow fever transmission in this country. However, Mozambique requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for all travellers over 9 months of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission. This requirement includes São Tomé and Principe, Somalia, and Tanzania. This requirement excludes Argentina, French Guiana, Paraguay, and South Sudan.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in this country. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Chikungunya Fever

Chikungunya fever occurs in this country.

Dengue Fever

Dengue fever occurs in this country.

Cholera

Cholera occurs in this country.

Schistosomiasis

This disease is present in this country and is acquired through contact with fresh water, such as swimming, bathing, or rafting. Well-chlorinated swimming pools and contact with saltwater in oceans or seas will not put travellers at risk for schistosomiasis.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis occurs in this country. Travellers to this country are at risk for tuberculosis if visiting sick friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Mozambique.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

The yellow fever vaccination is not recommended for this country. However, Mozambique requires a yellow fever vaccination certificate for all travellers over 9 months of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission. This requirement includes São Tomé and Principe, Somalia, and Tanzania. This requirement excludes Argentina, French Guiana, Paraguay, and South Sudan.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Mozambique.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Anti-malaria medication is recommended for travellers going to Mozambique. Recommended medications are atovaquone/proguanil, doxycycline, or mefloquine. Anti-malaria drug resistance for chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine has been reported.

Safety and Security in Mozambique

Emergency Numbers

+ 258 82 012 3455 Medical emergency number - English and Portuguese spoken

Personal Safety

Mozambique is considered a generally safe country to visit compared to other countries in the region, and most visitors do not experience any trouble. However, certain precautions should be followed to minimize safety risk.

Petty street crime, such as pickpocketing or robbery, does occur, and tourists or those who appear better off could be targeted. The risk is greater after dark. Avoid walking after dark even in tourist areas. Travellers should keep cash and valuables out of sight, and avoid carrying large amounts of cash. Petty crime is most common in Maputo, but is also increasing in tourist areas. There have been reports of restaurants being robbed after dark.

Avoid walking on Maputo’s Avenida Marginal between the Waterfront Restaurant and the Southern Sun Hotel (formerly the Holiday Inn) due to an increase in violent crime in this area.

There have been some reports of carjackings, and travel at night can be dangerous. There are reports that car-jackers wear military style clothing and stop cars in deserts or isolated areas. Travellers should keep doors locked and windows up as a precaution.

Since 2012, the business community has been targeted in a number of kidnappings in the Maputo area.

There is no security on beaches or offshore islands.

Be cautious at ATMs and avoid withdrawing cash at night.

Do not pick up hitchhikers or pedestrians or other motorists who appear to have trouble. This can be a tactic for robbery. If you believe someone is in trouble, notify the police on their behalf. Outside of Maputo and major cities, only travel by road during daytime hours and if possible, only travel in a convoy and on main roadways.

There have been reports of serious assault and robberies at two coastal resorts in the Inhambane province. Isolated beaches and picnic spots should be avoided.

Areas To Avoid

Exercise caution if travelling to the Sofala Province. Armed clashes occurred in this province until a peace accord was signed in September 2014. Banditry and political tensions are still a problem in remote areas around the Gorongosa hills, as well as in Muxungue, Chibabava, Meringue, Macoss and Canxixi.

In the southern and central provinces (Gaza, Inhambane, Manica, Tete, Sofala), mines still exist in some areas away from main roads. Stay on well-travelled roads, or always get advice from authorities before travelling in off-road areas. Minefields existed in the northern provinces of Nampula, Zambezia, Niassa, and Cabo Delgao, but all “known” minefields in these areas have been cleared.

Political Unrest

Minimize safety risk by avoiding public and political gatherings and demonstrations. Even peaceful protests can quickly and unexpectedly escalate. It is illegal in some countries for foreigners to participate in protests or demonstrations.

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