Honduras

Honduras

Use High Level of Caution
Avoid Travel to the following departments: Gracias a Dios and Cortés

The Republic of Honduras is located in Central America bordering Guatemala, Nicaragua, and El Salvador and with coastline on the Caribbean Sea and a short coastline on the Pacific coast. The population is approximately 8.4 million people.

Frequent revolutions characterised the 20th century in Honduras. Since 1952, military rule and coups have alternated with civilian governments. Honduras achieved a democratically elected civilian government in 1982 after about 25 years of military (dictatorship) rule. The government is a constitutional republic with a president as chief of state and head of government.

At least 50 percent of the population lives below the poverty line. Years of military rule, poverty, crime and natural disasters have left Honduras one of the poorest countries in the world. Hurricane Mitch in 1998 decimated crops and transportation infrastructure, setting the country back by at least 50 years. In 2008, severe flooding wiped out or damaged half the country’s roads.

After a 2009 coup, tourism declined dramatically. However, since 2011, the tourism industry has had a slow but steady recovery. Travellers can visit Maya ruins, the Río Plátano Biosphere Reserve, (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), beaches, national parks and colonial cities.

Currency HNL: Lempira
Language Spanish
Capital Tegucigalpa
Recent Alerts 7
Latest Alert October 21, 2019 - Spontaneous Protests in Honduras

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Honduras. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Honduras.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Honduras.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Honduras, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Malaria

Malaria transmission risk is high in the departments of Gracias a Dios and Islas de la Bahía, and moderate in Atlántida, Colón, Olancho, Valle and Yoro. There is no risk in San Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa. In 2017, sporadic cases were reported for the first time in the department of Comayagua.

Yellow Fever

There is no risk of yellow fever transmission in Honduras. A yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for travellers over 1 year of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited more than 12 hours through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission, and for travellers transiting through Honduras, coming from a country with a risk of yellow fever transmission. Also, a yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for all travellers over 1 year of age who are departing Honduras and travelling to countries/territories at risk for yellow fever transmission in Africa and Trinidad and Tobago.

Dengue Fever

Dengue fever occurs year-round in Honduras.

Chikungunya Fever

Chikungunya fever has occurred in this country.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in this country. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis occurs in this country. Travellers to this country are at risk for tuberculosis if visiting sick friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Chagas Disease

American trypanosomiasis (“Chagas disease”) occurs in this country. However, the risk of travellers acquiring this disease is very low unless staying in very poor quality housing or camping.

Zika Fever

There is transmission of the Zika virus in this country.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Honduras.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities, rural areas, or staying with friends and family.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

There is no risk of yellow fever transmission in Honduras. A yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for travellers over 1 year of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited more than 12 hours through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission, and for travellers transiting through Honduras, coming from a country with a risk of yellow fever transmission. Also, a yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for all travellers over 1 year of age who are departing Honduras and travelling to countries/territories at risk for yellow fever transmission in Africa and Trinidad and Tobago.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Honduras.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Anti-malaria medication is recommended for travellers going to risk areas of Honduras. The U.S. CDC recommends atovaquone-proguanil, chloroquine, doxycycline, mefloquine or primaquine. NaTHNac and WHO recommend chloroquine only.

Safety and Security in Honduras

Emergency Numbers

911
195
198

Emergency response operators may only speak Spanish.

Personal Safety

Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and other theft, occurs throughout Honduras and is a particular problem in bus stations, airports, shopping areas, etc. Stay alert in your surroundings at all times. Avoid wearing expensive clothing or jewellery and keep valuables and cash out of sight.

Violent crime is widespread in Honduras, often related to street gangs and drug trafficking, and includes murder, kidnapping, carjacking, sexual assault, and robbery. The risk increases at night. Avoid travelling or walking alone after dark, particularly in major cities and on isolated beaches. Foreigners in various areas have been attacked on the beach after dark.

Travel in groups or with tours when possible. Avoid travelling on public buses that are repainted school buses. Travellers are also advised to avoid discussing travel plans in public since some travellers have been followed and robbed.

On roads and highways, both in urban and rural areas, cars and buses have been hijacked and robbed. Often vehicles leaving major airports have been targeted. Drive with doors locked and windows closed. Never stop to help someone who appears to be in distress as this could be a ploy. Do not stop to help but rather report incidents or problems to the police. Do not hitchhike or pick up hitchhikers. Although Honduras has concluded its de-mining efforts, do not stray from main roads, especially around the border between Honduras and Nicaragua. Road travel may be dangerous due to poor road conditions, heavy traffic, poor vehicle maintenance and reckless driving.

Travellers should use official border crossing checkpoints only since there is a risk of encountering smuggling activities.

Exercise extreme caution when participating in outdoor adventure activities as safety standards may not be adequate. Ensure travel and medical insurance are purchased before leaving and ensure your insurance policy covers these types of activities.

Hurricanes are common in Honduras, especially between May-November. Flooding, landslides, major damage to infrastructure and disruption to travel plans may result. Be aware of the evacuation routes.

Honduras is located in a moderately-active seismic zone. In the event of a natural disaster, follow the advice of local authorities.

LGBTI travellers should note that although same-sex sexual activity is legal, same-sex marriage is not and violence against LGBTI people is high. If choosing to travel to Honduras, avoid public displays of affection.

Areas To Avoid

High levels of violent crime occur in the remote and border areas of Honduras, which often have inadequate or no police or security. Avoid travelling to the Departments of Gracias a Dios and to the border regions.

Due to high levels of violence and crime, avoid travelling to Chamelecon, Choloma and Cofradia in the department of Cortés.

Political Unrest

Demonstrations, sometimes violent, do occur throughout Honduras. Travellers should always avoid demonstrations and public gatherings as these situations can become violent without warning. It is illegal for foreigners to participate in demonstrations.

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