Uruguay

Uruguay

Use Normal Level of Caution

The Oriental Republic of Uruguay, the second-smallest country in South America, lies between Argentina and Brazil. The population is about 3.3 million people. The government is a constitutional republic with a president as both chief of state and head of government.

In the 1680s, Portugal established the first European settlement in Uruguay and the Spanish settled Montevideo in the 1720s. In the 1820s, Portugal annexed Uruguay as part of Brazil. Nationalistic feelings in the 19th century led to independence after an 1828 war.

Since 1985, Uruguay has had a civilian government. This country is one of the few countries in South America with a large middle class and was the first country in South America to establish a welfare state. Referred to as the “Switzerland of South America,” the country enjoys a stable government and social benefits, such as free education. Uruguay became part of the One Laptop Per Child project and was the first country in the world to provide a laptop for every primary school student.

Visitors to Uruguay can enjoy beach resorts, mild climate, and colonial towns.

Currency UYU: Uruguayan peso
Language Spanish
Capital Montevideo
Recent Alerts None
Latest Alert Not Available

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Uruguay. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a risk of hepatitis A in Uruguay through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is an intermediate risk of hepatitis B in Uruguay.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Uruguay, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Rabies

Rabies has been reported in domestic animals and bats. Travelers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travelers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) are at higher risk. Long-term travelers and expatriates may come in contact with rabid animals..

Chagas Disease

The risk for travellers is extremely low. There is a higher risk if staying in poor quality housing that might harbour the insect that transmits this disease.

Dengue Fever

Dengue fever can occur in Uruguay.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Uruguay.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is an intermediate risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Rabies Vaccine

The risk of exposure to rabies is low, but pre-travel vaccination against rabies is recommended for travelers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travelers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Persons with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travelers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Uruguay.

None required.

Safety and Security in Uruguay

Emergency Numbers

911
0800 8226 Tourist Attention and Information Service

Personal Safety

Visitors to Uruguay should exercise the usual precautions recommended for travellers, such as keep valuables in a hotel safe, exercise care when withdrawing money from an ATM, don’t carry large amounts of cash, stay away from poorly lit or isolated areas, etc. Avoid walking alone or at night. Keep your personal belongings secure and do not display money or expensive items such as jewellery, watches, etc.

Petty crime does occur in Uruguay, such as pickpocketing, robbery, mugging or theft from cars, particularly in Montevideo. The tourist police patrol Montevideo. Pay particular attention when in the Old City, the port area, Avenida 18 de Julio, and Plaza Independencia. There have been some reports of smash and grab theft from cars stopped at traffic lights.

Avoid the “Cerro” neighbourhood.

Traffic accidents are common. Drivers may not follow rules of the road and traffic may be disorganized, and many roads are winding and hilly.

Extreme Violence

There is a low rate of violent crime in Uruguay.

Political Unrest

Demonstrations occur frequently, but violence is rare and recently nonexistent. Transportation services can be disrupted, particularly on bridges connecting Uruguay and Argentina.

Avoid taking photographs of political demonstrations.

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