Guinea

Guinea

Use High Level of Caution

The Republic of Guinea is located in western Africa and borders Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Mali, Senegal, and Cote d'Ivoire, and has coastline on the North Atlantic Ocean. The population is about 11.4 million people. The government is a republic with a president as chief of state and a prime minister as head of government.

Guinea gained independence from France in 1958 and was ruled by dictatorial leaders for years. The first president, Ahmed Sekou Toure, worked toward a socialist agenda and during his 26-year tenure, thousands of people were tortured, killed or disappeared. The country held its first democratic elections in both 2010 and 2013 and inaugurated a new National Assembly in 2014. There are hopes for the development of democracy in Guinea.

In spite of Guinea’s rich natural resources, the country remains one of the poorest in the world. Tourism is not as developed as in some other African countries, and outside Conakry, there is little infrastructure for tourism. Travellers can visit the Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve (a UNESCO World Heritage Site), the Haut Niger National Park, the National Park of Niokolo-Badiar, and many areas that are ideal for hiking.

Currency GNF: Guinean franc
Language French
Capital Conakry
Recent Alerts None
Latest Alert Not Available

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Guinea. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Guinea through contaminated food or water.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Guinea.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Guinea, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Yellow Fever

There is a risk of yellow fever transmission in this country. A yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for travellers over 1 year of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission. The yellow fever vaccination is recommended for all travellers to Guinea 9 months of age and older.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in Guinea. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Meningitis

Meningitis outbreaks may occur in Guinea. Travellers who visit during the dry season (December to June) or expect to have prolonged contact with the local population are especially at risk.

Cholera

Cholera outbreaks occur in Guinea. The risk to travellers is low unless living or working in poor sanitary conditions, drinking untreated water or eating poorly cooked or raw seafood in this country.

Sleeping Sickness (Type 1)

There is an increased risk for travellers spending a lot of time outdoors or visiting game parks. Travellers to urban areas are not at risk.

Malaria

All areas of Guinea are at risk for malaria.

Chikungunya Fever

Chikungunya fever has occurred in this country.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis occurs in Guinea. Travellers to Guinea are at risk for tuberculosis if visiting sick friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Dengue Fever

Outbreaks of dengue fever may occur.

Schistosomiasis

This disease is present in Guinea and is acquired through contact with fresh water, such as swimming, bathing, or rafting. Well-chlorinated swimming pools and contact with saltwater in oceans or seas will not put travellers at risk for schistosomiasis.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Guinea.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of yellow fever transmission in this country. A yellow fever vaccination certificate is required for travellers over 1 year of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission. The yellow fever vaccination is recommended for all travellers to Guinea 9 months of age and older. The yellow fever vaccination is recommended for all travellers to Guinea 9 months of age and older.

Rabies Vaccine

Pre-travel vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Persons with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Meningitis Vaccine

Because this country is located in the sub-Saharan meningitis belt, vaccination against meningitis is recommended if travelling during the dry season (December to June).

Cholera Vaccine

The U.K. NaTHNaC recommends the oral cholera vaccine for some travellers whose activities or medical history put them at increased risk, travelling to areas of active cholera transmission. These risk factors include: aid workers; those going to areas of cholera outbreaks who have limited access to potable water and medical care; travellers for whom the vaccination would be considered potentially beneficial, such as chronic medical conditions. The U.S. CDC recommends the cholera vaccine for travellers who are 18-64 years of age and who plan to travel to areas of active cholera transmission. CDC notes that most travellers do not travel to areas of active cholera transmission, and that safe food and water practices can prevent many cholera infections.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Guinea.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Recommended anti-malaria medications include atovaquone-proguanil, mefloquine or doxycycline. Resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxime-pyrimethamine has been reported.

Safety and Security in Guinea

Emergency Numbers

(+224) 657 765 370 Local police in downtown Conakry

There are no adequate emergency services in Guinea. Travellers should check with their embassy to learn of any emergency services the embassy might provide.

Medical facilities in Guinea are inadequate. If you plan to travel outside Conakry, have basic medical and dental supplies with you. For emergencies or serious medical needs, consider medical evacuation to your home country or a country with adequate medical care available.

Personal Safety

Guinea does not have a high crime rate overall. However, petty crime is a problem; and incidents of armed assault, robbery, mugging and carjacking, often by armed people in military or police uniforms, are increasing. Petty crime can include pickpocketing, purse-snatching, and general theft.

Road travel can be difficult since road conditions are poor and vehicles are poorly maintained. If you must travel by road, carry necessary supplies, including fuel and basic medical supplies.

Armed groups may set up roadblocks for the purpose of robbery. There are regular reports of robberies on the route Conakry-Mamou-Faranah-Kissidougou-N'zerekore.

You may encounter police checkpoints across the country, therefore, carry identification at all times.
There are reports of tourists being targeted, especially at the airport, markets, hotels or restaurants. Theft is a particular problem in the Taouyah, Madine, and Niger markets in Conakry. Groups of children may also target foreigners for theft.

Consensual homosexual relations are against the law in Guinea, and penalties include fines and prison terms.

Areas To Avoid

Avoid areas that border Senegal, Guinea Bissau, Côte d’Ivoire, Liberia and Sierra Leone due to ethnic and armed conflict.

Political Unrest

There is a risk of political violence, riots and ethnic violence in Guinea. Avoid all public gatherings or demonstrations to minimize safety risk.

Get A Free Account!

Sitata uses advanced software algorithms to monitor the world for disease outbreaks and safety hazards. Each travel alert published by Sitata is reviewed by staff to ensure it meets the concerns of a traveller.

Sign up for a free account so that you can prepare for your trip and view the latest alerts.

Plan A Trip