Togo

Togo

Use Normal Level of Caution

The Togolese Republic (Togo) is located in Africa bordering Burkina Faso, Ghana, Benin and has about 56 kilometers of coastline on the Gulf of Guinea. The population is about 7.3 million people. The government is a republic with a president as chief of state and a prime minister as head of government.

Togo gained independence from France in 1960. For about 40 years, the country was under military rule. The Rally of the Togolese People Party (RPT), backed by the president, has been in power since 1967, although there have been questions about election irregularities. Despite efforts in Togo to transition to a multi-party democracy, the RPT still maintains a majority in the legislature today. Togo experienced political turbulence and human rights abuses in the 1990s. Today, Togo still faces many of these challenges but has made progress in infrastructure, education and healthcare improvements, and business reforms.

In Lomé, Kara and Kpalimé, there are some tourist facilities, however, outside the capital, there is little tourism infrastructure. Travellers can enjoy beautiful beaches and landscapes, hiking, visiting voodoo shrines and visiting the Koutammakou, the land of the Batammariba, a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Currency XOF: CFA franc
Language French
Capital Lomé
Recent Alerts 2
Latest Alert February 25, 2017 - Meningitis infects hundreds in Togo

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Togo. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a significant risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Togo through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Togo.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Togo, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Yellow Fever

There is a risk for yellow fever in this country.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in Togo. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Dengue Fever

Outbreaks of dengue fever may occur.

Malaria

All areas of Togo are at high risk for malaria.

Meningitis

Meningitis outbreaks may occur in Togo. Travellers who visit during the dry season (December to June) or expect to have prolonged contact with the local population are especially at risk.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis occurs in Togo. Travellers to Togo are at risk for tuberculosis if visiting sick friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Schistosomiasis

This disease is present in Togo and is acquired through contact with fresh water, such as swimming, bathing, or rafting. Well-chlorinated swimming pools and contact with saltwater in oceans or seas will not put travellers at risk for schistosomiasis.

Chikungunya Fever

Chikungunya fever may occur in this country.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Togo.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a significant risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

This country requires all travellers 9 months of age and older to have a yellow fever vaccination certificate.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Meningitis Vaccine

Because this country is located in the sub-Saharan meningitis belt, vaccination against meningitis is recommended if travelling during the dry season (December to June).

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Togo.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Recommended anti-malaria medications include atovaquone-proguanil, mefloquine or doxycycline. Resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxime-pyrimethamine has been reported.

Safety and Security in Togo

Emergency Numbers

117

Personal Safety

Togo authorities warn of an increase in crime in Togo, including violent crime targeting both citizens and foreigners. Some attacks have occurred with weapons, including firearms and machetes. Petty crime, such as pickpocketing and other theft is common, especially in beach and market areas. People have been attacked during the day or night. Be vigilant and stay with a group. Authorities recommend that you enter or exit public places with a group. Avoid beach areas, day or night, where there is no security.

Always be alert to your surroundings and personal safety. Keep valuables secured and out of sight. Safeguard your important documents, such as your passport. Only carry as much cash as you need.

Theft while using taxis does occur. Do not share taxi rides with strangers. Negotiate before you get into the taxi and insist that the driver not stop for additional passengers.

Carjackings do occur. Drivers should stop only for individuals in uniform, particularly after dark. Avoid travelling alone if possible even within Lomé city limits, especially after dark.

Do not travel outside Lomé at night, and if possible, travel in a convoy of at least two cars. Roads can be hazardous. There are reports that people have been killed resisting a carjacking. It may be better not to resist an attack.

Swimming in the ocean can be dangerous due to very strong currents and undertows, and many people drown every year.

It is illegal to photograph any government-affiliated place or personnel, such as government buildings, police or military areas, airports, police or military personnel. Government-related locations may not be marked.

There are heavy penalties for the purchase or use of illicit drugs.

There are heavy penalties for same-sex relationships or behaviours in Togo.

Areas To Avoid

Avoid the public beach area in Lomé at night, particularly around the Hotel Sarakawa and Boulevard du Mono (“beach road”).

Theft occurs regularly in the Lomé market areas, along the beaches, particularly where there is no security. Avoid going alone to the Grand Marché area during the day, and avoid the area completely at night.

Avoid the border areas with Ghana.

Political Unrest

In Togo, political demonstrations, rallies and strikes have occurred, and at times, these situations have turned violent. Avoid all public gatherings or demonstrations.

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