Montenegro

Montenegro

Use Normal Level of Caution

Montenegro, in southeastern Europe, has coastline on the Adriatic Sea and shares borders with Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. With a population of about 650,000 people, Montenegro is a sovereign republic. An elected president serves as head of state, with a prime minister as head of the executive branch of government. The Parliament of Montenegro is the country’s legislative body. Montenegro also recognizes the Royal House of Petrović-Njegoš, which is entrusted with promoting Montenegrin identity through non-political activities.

Following the end of World War I, Montenegro was part of Yugoslavia until its dissolution in 1992. Subsequently Montenegro joined with Serbia to form the Socialist Federated Republic of Yugoslavia. In 2003, the federation decentralized and became the state union of Serbia and Montenegro. In 2006 Montenegro exercised a constitutional provision and held a referendum that led to its status as a fully independent state. Montenegro became a member of NATO in June 2017.

Today, Montenegro’s economy relies on the export of non-precious metals and tourism. The Montenegrin Adriatic coastline, with pristine beaches and well-preserved ancient towns, is incredibly picturesque and a prime destination for vacationing Europeans. Travellers looking for beauty off the beaten path can hike and bike through unspoiled forests and mountain ranges.

Currency EUR: Euro
Language Montenegrin; Serbian widely spoken
Capital Podgorica
Recent Alerts 1
Latest Alert July 18, 2017 - Fires in Croatia and Montenegro

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Montenegro. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Montenegro through contaminated food or water.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Montenegro.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in Montenegro. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Tick-Borne Encephalitis

There is a risk of tick-borne encephalitis in some areas of the country below 1,400 meters. The area mainly affected is the coastal region of the Adriatic Sea. The transmission season varies, however, and ticks are most active during early spring to late autumn (March to November).

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Montenegro.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccine

Vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis is recommended if travelling in areas where contact with ticks might occur (camping, hiking, outdoor activities) below 1,400 meters during early spring to late autumn (March to November).

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Montenegro.

None required.

Safety and Security in Montenegro

Emergency Numbers

122
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123

Personal Safety

The crime rate is low in this country, and most travellers have no trouble. However, petty crime, such as pickpocketing, bag snatching, or other theft can occur in any crowded area or tourist destination. Petty crime occurs on public transport and in other crowded areas, particularly in Podgorica and other large towns.

With respect to personal safety and security, always be alert in your surroundsings. Keep valuables secured and out of sight. Avoid signs of affluence (expensive clothing or jewelry) to avoid being targeted by thieves, and do not carry large amounts of cash. Safeguard your important documents. Avoid walking alone at night. Do not accept drinks or food from strangers and never leave your drinks out of your sight.

Avoid the areas where there may be military or security force activities, particularly along the southern border.

Organized crime is regarded as being widespread, but does not target tourists.

Montenegrin roads are poorly maintained and secondary roads are narrow. The two-lane Moraca Canyon in Montenegro can be particularly dangerous, due to poor road conditions and overcrowding. Roads leading to Montenegro’s coastal areas are in better condition but can be overcrowded during the summer season.

You are required by law to carry with you a valid form of identification at all times, for example, a driving license or passport, or you may be subject to a fine. Keep a photocopy of your passport in a safe place.

Areas To Avoid

In areas bordering Kosovo, stay on main roads. Unexploded land mines are known to be along the Kosovo border.

Political Unrest

Travellers are advised to avoid demonstrations and political gatherings as they are unpredictable and can become violent with little warning.

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