Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan

Use Normal Level of Caution
Use High Level of Caution when visiting the following Provinces: Kashkadarya, Samarkand, Jizzakh, Sirdaryo, Surkhandarya, and Tashkent
Avoid Travel to the following Provinces: Andijon, Ferghana, and Namangan

The Republic of Uzbekistan is located in central Asia bordering Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Afghanistan and coastline on the Aral Sea. The population is about 29 million people. The government is a presidential republic that is highly authoritarian with very little power outside the executive branch. A president is the chief of state and a prime minister is the head of government.

Uzbekistan was inhabited as far back as the Stone Age. The oldest and second-largest city is Samarkand, which was an important stop on Asian trading routes for more than 2500 years. In 1885, Russia annexed the regions then known as Turkestan. After the Russian Revolution in 1917, the country tried to establish a western-style democracy. However, in 1924, Soviets took over, and in 1925, the country was admitted to the Soviet Union. Uzbekistan gained independence in 1991.

The Uzbek government has begun a program for developing tourism, and Uzbekistan has potential to become a popular destination. Travellers will find ancient cities with interesting architecture, markets and bazaars, as well as UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Ichan Kala, the Historic Centre of Bukhara, the Historic Centre of Shakhrisyabz, and Samarkand Crossroads of Cultures.

Currency UZS: Uzbekistan som
Language Uzbek (official); Recognized regional language is Karakalpak
Capital Tashkent
Recent Alerts None
Latest Alert Not Available

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Uzbekistan. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a risk for hepatitis A virus exposure in Uzbekistan through contaminated food or water. Infection can still occur at tourist destinations and resorts.

Hepatitis B

There is a significant risk for acquiring hepatitis B in Uzbekistan.

Typhoid Fever

Unvaccinated people can become infected through contaminated food and water in Uzbekistan, especially when visiting smaller cities, villages, or rural areas where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Rabies

Rabies occurs in the Uzbekistan. Travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travelers, and cavers) may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk.

Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis occurs in Uzbekistan. Travellers to Uzbekistan are at risk for tuberculosis if visiting sick friends or family, working in the health care field, or having close prolonged contact with the general population.

Malaria

There is a very low risk of malaria in the extreme southeast of Uzbekistan.

Leishmaniasis

Leishmaniasis occurs in this country.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Uzbekistan.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to hepatitis A for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

There is a significant risk of infection with hepatitis B for this country, therefore, the vaccination is recommended.

Typhoid Fever Vaccine

There is a risk of exposure to typhoid fever in this country through consumption of unsafe food and water. Since exposure to unsafe sources is variable within this country, the vaccination against typhoid fever is generally recommended, especially when visiting smaller cities or rural areas, where food and water sources may be contaminated.

Rabies Vaccine

Vaccination against rabies is recommended for travellers involved in outdoor activities (e.g., campers, hikers, bikers, adventure travellers, and cavers) and who may have direct contact with rabid dogs, bats, and other mammals. Those with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wildlife professionals, researchers) and long-term travellers and expatriates are at higher risk and should be vaccinated.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Uzbekistan.

Anti-malarial Drugs

Anti-malaria medication is not recommended.

Safety and Security in Uzbekistan

Emergency Numbers

02
03
01

Personal Safety

Most travellers to Uzbekistan have no trouble. However, petty crime, such as pickpocketing, bag snatching, or other theft can occur, and foreigners have been targeted. Always be alert to your personal safety and security. Keep valuables secured and out of sight to avoid being targeted. Safeguard your important documents, such as your passport. Avoid walking alone at night. Thefts have been reported by those travelling in unofficial taxis and on trains. There have been reports of police or imposters harassing foreigners. If there is any question, ask for identification or ask to pay any fines at a police station.

Areas To Avoid

Avoid Andijan and the eastern area of the Ferghana Valley.

Avoid border areas with Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Afghanistan. The security situation in these areas is unstable. There is the risk of armed conflict, border disputes, and unmarked landmine areas. Borders may be closed with short notice.

Political Unrest

In any country, avoid public demonstrations or protests since these situations can escalate unexpectedly.

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