Malta

Malta

Use Normal Level of Caution

The Republic of Malta is an island nation archipelago in the Mediterranean Sea, south of Sicily, Italy, with an area of 122 square miles. The Maltese archipelago consists of the islands of Malta, Gozo, Comino, Comminotto and Filfla. The government is a parliamentary republic with a president as chief of state and a prime minister as head of government. The population is about 415,200 people.

The island of Malta was first colonized by the Phoenicians and Carthaginians between 1000 and 600 BCE. Over the centuries, the country was ruled by Arabs and Normans. From 1814, Malta was part of the British empire and was an important naval base for the Allies. In 1964, Malta gained independence, and in 1974, became the Republic of Malta.

Malta has become a popular tourist destination and a destination for medical tourism. Travellers are attracted by the beaches, warm climate, opportunities for surfing and diving, and three UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Currency EUR: Euro
Language English; Maltese
Capital Valletta
Recent Alerts None
Latest Alert Not Available

Diseases To Be Aware Of

The diseases listed below are those which occur most often in Malta. Other, less frequently encountered diseases might be displayed within the Travel Alerts section if they have occurred recently.

Hepatitis A

There is a risk of exposure to hepatitis A in Malta.

Hepatitis B

There is a risk of exposure to hepatitis B in Malta.

Rabies

Rabies may be present in bats.

Yellow Fever

There is no risk of yellow fever in this country, however, a certificate of yellow fever vaccination is required from travellers 9 months of age and older arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited for more than 12 hours through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission. If indicated on epidemiological grounds, infants under 9 months of age are subject to isolation or surveillance if coming from an area with risk of yellow fever transmission.

Vaccinations to Consider

The following is a list of recommended vaccinations for travelling to Malta.

Hepatitis A Vaccine

The hepatitis A vaccine is recommended.

Hepatitis B Vaccine

The hepatitis B vaccine is recommended

Rabies Vaccine

Travellers involved in outdoor and other activities that might bring them into direct contact with bats (such as adventure travellers and cavers), as well as travellers with occupational risks (such as veterinarians, wild life professionals and researchers), should consider the rabies vaccination.

Yellow Fever Vaccine

There is no risk of yellow fever in this country, however, a certificate of yellow fever vaccination is required from travellers 9 months of age and older arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited for more than 12 hours through an airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission. If indicated on epidemiological grounds, infants under 9 months of age are subject to isolation or surveillance if coming from an area with risk of yellow fever transmission.

Medications to Consider

The following is a list of recommended medications for travelling to Malta.

None required.

Safety and Security in Malta

Emergency Numbers

112

Personal Safety

The crime rate is low in Malta, and most travellers have no trouble. Violent crime is rare. However, petty crime, such as pickpocketing, bag snatching, or other theft can occur. Be particularly cautious on public transportation, around markets and stores in Valletta and Marsaxlokk, beaches, and the nightclub areas of Paceville in St. Julian’s (San Ġiljan) and Sliema. Exercise caution on buses, especially the 12, 13, 14 and 15 services from Sliema, St. Julian's and Paceville to Valletta. Always be alert in your surroundings. Keep valuables secured and out of sight. Safeguard your important documents, such as your passport. Avoid walking alone at night.

There have been reports of travellers being drugged and robbed at bars. Do not accept drinks or food from strangers and never leave your drinks out of your sight. The lack of crowd control and excessive drinking has led to violent incidents, some racially motivated, in the Paceville nightclub area.

Traffic drives on the left. Roads may be in poor condition, and drivers may not follow standard rules of the road.

Selling, using or possessing illegal drugs in Malta can bring severe penalties.

There are no laws against same-sex relationships or behaviour in Malta.

Political Unrest

In any country, avoid public demonstrations or protests. These situations can escalate and turn violent quickly and unexpectedly.

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